Skip to main content

tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 12, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PST

3:00 am
the freshman orientation going on. that's going to do it for "way too early." "morning joe" starts right now. now. >> president obama find himself in beijing for apec. the asia pacific comiskey corporation, summit conference dedicated to promoting what are you, nice, spell out apec? are you kidding meeconomimeecony good fireworks.
3:01 am
>> okay. gentleman, close the newspaper. it's wednesday, november 12th, 2014. kim kardashian apparently naked again. how surprising. with us on set, we have we have a staff writer with the hill, good to have you all on board. in a sort of clean-up time on capitol hill, as democrats and republicans are trying to stem the bleeding from their own gaffes and it's a turn that michael kinsly defined as when someone in washington gets caught telling the truth them obamacare story which i saw yesterday and i'm surprised it didn't emerge. today the most serious of gaffes
3:02 am
came from jonathan gruber, a man described by many as the architect of obamacare. he was speaking at the university of p. last year when he said the lack of transparency in the law was instrumental in getting it in the past because of the quote stupidity of the american voter. >> jesus. >> a lack of transparency a a huge political advantage. calm at this time stupidity of the american voter, whatever, basically, that was critical to the past. it's the second best argument. i'd rather have this law than not. it's kind of like the reporter story the things i can change but rather have this law than not. >> i don't think you say that, that mate be a problem. >> the problem is that he thinks it. >> the core problem under law was put together by a bunch of elitists two don't fundamentally understand the american people. that's what the problem is. >> yesterday, so now we are
3:03 am
covering it. the professor apologized. take a look. >> the comments in the video were made at an economic conference. i basically spoke inappropriately. public poilts that involves spending is politically less palatable than policies for the tax code. it would have made more sense to do obamacare the way we do in wis swiss to give people money, that was politically feasible. instead, it was done through the tax code. that was the only point i was making. >> an interesting dynamic. we are trying to get to it. nobody covered it. except for some right wing, but had this been a republican economic what down would have happened? >> well, he is, this century is defined, david stockman, who is ronald reagan's original budget director, in 1981 in an extensive magazine piece in the
3:04 am
old atlantic magazine by bill ryder, a former walk post editor, david stockman sat down with him. he was reagan's budget director, sat down for many, many times, explained the budget. he said, bakeally, none of us really understands what any of these numbers are about, the federal budget. >> let me guess, nobody felt this right? >> president reagan had no idea what those numbers were about. >> a few left wing bloggers brought it up. it wasn't covered economic i believe there was a huge firestorm, exactly, that's my point. >> david stockman was the director of the office of management and budget. this guy is a consultant. so it's a slightly different -- >> well, he's one of the architects, is he not economic you can't define him as an arc next obamacare? >> he did play a significant role as a consultant. but he's the consultant not the architect. >> if he's saying that out loud, that's a reflection of the group.
3:05 am
>> i agree. i agree. if you are ronald reagan's office of management and budget director, you have direct access to the president. this guy probably had stomach says to the president. but my guess is for the most part he didn't so i'm not excuseing the language. it's terrible. it does. it's how we got this bill, which is very complicated. >> it's bad. we have to look at how we cover things on each side of the aisle. elise, what's your take what did you find? >> i think we have to remember the fancy pelosi comment that makes this comment more on the republican side. she said we have to pass this bill to see what's in it. i think that that has continued to echo through campaign astd, through the debate over the law four, five years out. again, this makes republicans extra sex e sensitive to the idea that he can heck reform was
3:06 am
concob by democrats in a room in a kind of a conspiratorial way. i'm not saying that is what happened. i'm saying that is what republicans say happened him i think that is an impression that is very difficult for democrats due to these comments. they need to be much more careful. clearly, there was a much more open process than a lot of republicans believe. anybody who was covering the formulation of the bill over months and months can tell you that the pieces were reported on. they were worked out. republicans might not think they had enough input, but these comments are very damaging. they continue to contribute to this idea that obamacare was hatched in a dark room and that it was a conspiracy. >> how, howard? >> first of all, for reasons that the republicans didn't have input is they didn't want any input. they attacked this bill from day one. for them not to complain, the health care bill, all tamp trying to do is sab tanl sit a bit much. sec of all, i think we have
3:07 am
about as much mile annual out of obamacare as we can. it is the law. there were plenty of things i didn't like in the bill. we can go through them if you want, because i always like to do that. but it is the law and it's worked and i don't think if we're trying this in anyway into the debacle last week that it had much to do with it. i think this is basically boating a dead horse. >> okay. so while we're on gas on the republican side, former governor hayley barber says he's sorry for calling president obama's policies tar babies. >> oh, come on. >> on a post-election conference calm. >> how do you do that? >> barber, who once chaired the rnc, tells politico, quote, if someone takes offense, i will regret it. again, neither the context nor the connotation was intended to offend. if you are less than moved by its apology, you may be even less impressed by harlem
3:08 am
congressman carley rangel. he is trying to explain why he called tea party republicans white crackers. oh my god, it's like, we're not the onion. we swear. this is true. in an interview, the long-time congressman now says he thought white crackers was a term of endearment. >> no. >> who are these people? >> this must be the air pollution or something that's coming over from by a jenning affecting people's brains. unbelievable. >> before comparing tea party republicans to jim crowe segregation -- what, what, i'm going to go. >> it's an initial comment. it's also an explanation. i thought that was -- >> i thought that was a gape in the story. >> wow. matt, lewis, let's get you in on
3:09 am
this conversation, if you want to be in on this conversation. those last two were ugly comments, the first one talking about obamacare has more impatience for what's happening in the country bus of the law that's passed. what is your reaction from gruber? . >> obviously, it's a horrible thing that he said him i think it's a gaffe precisely because he's telling the truth. whether it was president obama's promise if you leak your doctor, can you keep it. if you like your insurance plan, you can keep it. whether it was the sort of behind the scenes, corn husker kickback t. way this bill was sort of pushed through, you know, one party pushed it through. it's been really ugly him that's the end. now we certainly have an skags that the american public was misled. if they knew what was in this bill, they probably wouldn't have supported it. i have to say, as damaging as the scandal is. i think more importantly it's something else that gruber said,
3:10 am
which is that, you know, he knew in advance that states who didn't sort of, you know, create their own exchange wouldn't be eligible for these tax subsidies and that, in fact, is a big question that's not only scandalous but relevant as we enter into a supreme court decision, which could potentially damage obamacare. so i think grouber, you know, there is the gaffe, the more politically toxic gaffe and the slightly substantive gaffe that i think will be with us for a lot longer. >> all right. let move on. let move on, wisconsin governor scott walker is pushing ahead with a controversial plan to drug test recipients of public assistance. the proposal would apply to people receiving unemployment benefits and food stamps. a spokes woman for the governor says he would spend the next several e several weeks working with a cabinet to create a proposal. this year alabama and missouri pass bills that allow drug tests
3:11 am
if an applicant was suspected of using drugs. in 2010, 12 states failed to pass those calling for suspicionless drug testing just across the board. wisconsin is one of five states that currently perform drug tests on public assistance applicant that have felony drul convictions. howard, actually, you are perfect for this. what down of the concept economic i guess there is possibly proof it's unconstitutional and yet. >> there is anderson, this is the gop not content with waging a war on women. they're now waging a war on poor people. >> are they? >> absolutely. >> why? >> because they're singleing people. are you getting unemployment, that means you were working, if you lost youroyou are a suspect for using drugs. >> why are you using drugs, why can't you be told to go get treatment? >> we just get a drug test economic some of the police are
3:12 am
entitled to grab us off the street and take us into the -- >> for the sake of argument, let me ask you, if you are going to be receiving money from the government, isn't it okay to say we will give you money or support you. >> okay. so let's tax everybody on wall street. >> if you are breaking the law. >> let's do drug tests down here 15 blocks away on wall street. that's government money, too, what the hell is going on here economic you can't take citizens who pay taxes, then they become unfortunate, they lose theironow you will test them for drugs. it's on poor people. scott walker is too immature to be a governor. >> matt lewis. >> i do understand what governor doan is saying. it does sort of the libertarian in me is a little concerned, once government as we say increasingly are in all of our live, all of a sudden there are expectations you would have to
3:13 am
comply. having said that, if the citizens of wisconsin decide that this is appropriate, i think we should, you know, i'm not financial to throw it out. look, it's their money. it's not the government's money, it's coming from the taxpayers. so i'm a little bit conflicted on this. but i don't think it's like an old wellian thing we are making it out to be either. >> there is a fundamental misunderstanding of what it means to be poor in this country. i think the fundamental misunderstanding of this concept is how too many people in various state legislatures, nobody elections to be poor. nobody has a child and says i hope this child grows up to be poor. >> i totally agree with you. >> why don't we drug test the members of each and every legislature. >> that's a great idea. >> before they vote on these dock a maim my bills. if you are an insurance company, you are looking for a break from the legislature.
3:14 am
>> maybe we can vote for walker so all the legislature and the government gets scheduled. aren't they on welfare economic they're getting taxpayer's money and they're doing nothing, right? >> hmm. scott walker, meanwhile, one of two presidential contenders drawing attention to hillary clinton's age. while speaking about the former secretary of state, i know, senator rand paul said, quote, it's a very tax, undertaking to go through. it's a rigorous physical ordeal, i think, to be able to campaign for the presidency. well, you know, i think she would know, right. governor walker said over the weekend that clinton, who is 67, quote, embodies that old, tired top down approach from the government. not everyone is kounding the years. a recent puig survey 15 to 13-year-olds think hillary; 59 or younger. 25% correctly identified her
3:15 am
age. demographics show voters in 2016 will be just as young and diverse as they were in 2012. elise, what do you think? >> i think those younger voters will go for hillary by some margin because they will be excited about eelecting the first woman president. i don't think her age is going to be a major issue except when republicans try to make it an issue. we already seen the campaign committees go after this, even prior to the mid-term election, they laying the groundwork for the attacks. there are no doubt people older tan hillary clinton that will hold that job. >> lit so backfire, if they do that. nobody likes it when people do that. >> let me just say i think a couple things. if you look at those two statements, they're inadvertently calling a roll. i seen people like mike mccurie and tina brown have made similar folks, does she really want this
3:16 am
at this point in her life, she's got grandkids. i think the age thing is relevant. i think she can overcome it. it was relevant when walter mon dale brought that up and reagan hit that out of the park. she can show she is up to it. she runs a vigorous campaign. she doesn't sort of run the sort of inevitable rose garden campaign. by the way, it's the fact that she's been in the public eye for more than two decades. >> that would be called experience. >> i think that makes her more ready. >> come on. >> the interesting thing about this is we rarely go back a generation. the only time in my lifetime we've gone back is from carter to reagan. otherwise, you turn the page on a generation, you don't go back. this time i think we will. i think the republicans are likely to nominate somebody like scott walker and rand paul. the public will be scared these
3:17 am
wet behind the people did their job. >> they already did that, this past time. so hillary clinton is in the perfect pocket. anybody that wants to make fun of her age will laugh her out of the room. >> you attack people personally. >> a woman. by the way, you guys, women live longer, right, we all know this, sorry, guys. >> i can't believe we are talking about this. >> yeah, we will go. >> we will bring it up again. >> it's great to have you on. thank you so much. a great job on your reporting him still ahead on ""morning joe,"" senator elect tom tillis will join us in our next hour. actress angelica huston and stephen king will be with us on set. this time a streaming musk company is striking back against the pop star. did you hear about this accounts a brazen armed robbery in brazen
3:18 am
daylight a 2350u weeks from here. helicopters were hovering all over the place. and they bought the the jules. the suspects are still at large. we'll have the full story when ""morning joe"" comes right back. and just give them the basics, you know. i got this. [thinking] is it that time? the son picks up the check? [thinking] i'm still working. he's retired. i hope he's saving. i hope he saved enough. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. whether you're just starting your 401(k) or you are ready for retirement, we'll help you get there. [ female announcer ] aveeno® daily moisturizing lotion has active naturals® oat with five vital nutrients. [ aniston ] because beautiful skin
3:19 am
goes with everything. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results™. aveeno®. so ally bank really has no hidden fethat's right. accounts? it's just that i'm worried about you know "hidden things..." ok, why's that? no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates. it's not about how many miles you can get out of the c-max hybrid. it's about how much life you can fit into it. ♪ the ford c-max hybrid. with an epa-estimated range of 540 miles on a tank of gas. and all the room you need to enjoy the trip. go stretch out.
3:20 am
3:21 am
what's her problem? >> leading from behind. >> twice now they've used that lin line. >> sorry. >> go ahead. >> does anyone think the shot of kim kardashian in the paper is attractive? howard?
3:22 am
uw, gross. it's gross it's sometimes too much, people, leave a little mystery. >> mystery is not her thing. >> i don't get it. >> we can't even show it, either. but it's not this is incredible, the new york times, get me through this. they are investigating a bold robbery about three blocks from husband. 2:30 yesterday afternoon, oh my god, it's actually frightening. a man posing as a delivery worker, an accomplice angted as a lookout. the dis-greiss i guysed thief pistol whipped an employee and forced him to open a safe when a fifth employee entered the officer the two men fled the scene and the suspects made off with an estimated $2 million in
3:23 am
jewelry and watches. >> veteran's day parade, goes up fifth avenue, a half a block from where that is crawling can cops and military personnel they have to walk outdoor, incredible, a decade and a billion dollars in the making, a european space probe named rosetta is trying to land, it's trying to keep it from bouncing off the dusty surface. because it's so far away, it takes the radio transmiter eight minutes to return. >> the time line in usa today, the model is a size 10 and says she is actually kind of thin. >> that's what i thought when i
3:24 am
saw the picture. >> i'm going with it here. leak a normal lean woman. >> what's the problem? >> her selection as the representative, she's perfectly fit, maybe a little thin. ground breaking. an article in the "elle" magazine called it plus size. what is wrong with people? are you making sure we have a generation of anorexics, seriously. that's why we have them. >> i want to see her again, please, i'll be the judge. >> she says she has gotten feedback from teen girls that look more like them representing tags. >> that picture is plus size? >> that is normal. >> may be a little thin. >> what is wrong with people? >> she looks fantastic. >> an ongoing story from can the times" taylor swift publicly
3:25 am
pulled her songs from the streaming service last week. many say that spotify doesn't pay enough. swift was on track to make $6 million this year. still, by comparison, her new record "1989" pulled in nearly $12 million in its first week alone. he defended the streaming service payout to artists saying they have given $2 billion to songwriters since 2008. >> spotify is great. she sold 1.2 million albums in a week without a -- >> that's a rockstar. new york steaks service aimed at women finds loyal following, women request a car and a female driver to transport them around the city the concept is aimed at helping women feel safer in cabs in cities around the country. while anyone is able to use the app, there are male driving, only parties including women can
3:26 am
request a female driver. >> interesting. i think it works. what separates real mai-mai mayonnaise? it's the eggs. just mayo, hellman's is claiming the name is misleading. they are accusing horse and buggy definitions. >> mayo fight. >> how'd that one get in there? >> i don't know. i like the pumpkin on the deer's head. >> why do you keep going back to that picture? >> it reflects that we have been dealing with it. walking around. >> i'm serious. it wasn't even a pumpkin. it was a plastic pumpkin.
3:27 am
>> the little guy. okay. that's what it means. >> that's because young earl tackled him. >> on a deer stand. >> the things we know. okay. we will show that later. when someone boring comes. oh, there it is. >> there it is. oh. >> oh. >> that's just not right. >> he tackled him and pulled it off. >> just awesome. >> all right. coming up, why humans are terry philadelphia for failure and eager for new adventures at the same time. we'll explain ahead. the must-read opinion pages. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ let us be lovers, we'll marry our fortunes together ♪
3:28 am
♪ i've got some real estate here in my bag ♪ ♪ it took me four days to hitch-hike from saginaw ♪ ♪ "i've come to look for america" ♪ well, i drove grandpa to speed dating this week, so i should probably get the last roll. dad, but i practiced my bassoon. and i listened. i can do this. everyone deserves ooey gooey pillsbury cinnamon rolls. make the weekend pop! dad,thank you mom for said this oftprotecting my future.you.
3:29 am
thank you for being my hero and my dad. military families are uniquely thankful for many things, the legacy of usaa auto insurance could be one of them. if you're a current or former military member or their family, get an auto insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life. which means it's time thfor the volkswagens here, sign-then-drive event. for practically just your signature, you could drive home for the holidays in a german-engineered volkswagen. like the sporty, advanced new jetta and the well-crafted all-new golf. if you're wishing for a new volkswagen this season just about all you need is a finely tuned... pen. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit and zero first month's payment on select new volkswagen models. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you have enough money to live life on your terms?
3:30 am
i sure hope so. with healthcare costs, who knows. umm... everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor.... can get the real answers you need. start building your confident retirement today.
3:31 am
joining us now for the must read opinion pages, john meacham, hello there. >> that was said with such affection. >> yeah, it was. >> how long will you stay here. >> we have a new york post picture to show you. >> okay. are you gone in ten minutes. okay. dana mill banks writes in the
3:32 am
washington post obama's adviser is too easy on him. white house correspondent asked dennis mcdonnough to say one thing to american voters, they will seem stiffer given the message they sent on tuesday. mcdonagh's reply, they will see washington working better if this president has his way. his willful cluelessness is the latest evidence that obama urgently needs new blood in his white house. the place is full of talent. what's missing, though, a political peer of the presidents, one with the stature and the authority to tell him when he's screwing up, without that, obama has an aforemention. >> isn't that the case for the president, they reach a certain point, there aren't any people left who will tell him no? >> they usually reach that point about 1:15 on inauguration day. >> exactly.
3:33 am
>> self aware presidents tell you they know when people come to the oval office, they're come income there the truth with the bark off. they come in there like george w. bush said what a lovely town, mr. president. what you want to do, you have to make this as comfortable as possible for them to do it. it's really hard. but the great ones do it. i do think that president obama two years here not a lot of time and does have to work on getting candid advice coming up. ron fornier, republicans didn't when the mid-terms. they lost less, interesting. neither party is capable at the moment of winning elect, only loseing less than the other guys. looking ahead to 2016, they seek to disrupt orthodox. but their mission may be impossible from inside the
3:34 am
parties, the senate and washington. they have lost all trust in institutions, which is why last week's results were less a victory than a warning. do you agree? >> look, maybe i would have given republicans a week to celebrate and be happy. but ron jumped right into it. look, i think, fundamentally, he's right. republicans didn't really have a mandate. this was a rejection of obama and his policy, as he said, his policies were on the ballot. but that doesn't mean that the public has bought into, you know, conservative ideas and i think republicans have a long way to go. they should see this as an opportunity of compelling conservative philosophy, an alternative to obama. hopefully, that will happen organically as we head into the 2016 campaign him i might have waited a little longer to rain on their parade. i think ron is generally right.
3:35 am
>> i think that's true, ideally. one problem they have is if you are going to craft a truly coherent national message, you need a voice doing that, a personally around him that can coalesce. as one of the pieces made clear there morning. the party has a diversity of youth. if you have rick santorum to rand paul. >> it's kind of interesting. howard dean, you are ready for hillary? >> no, i'm not. i'm supporting hillary. >> oh, no, no, no. but you are for hillary clinton for president. >> i am. >> what is your concept? >>. >> the banks are too big. they're endangering the financial status of the country and the world. >> is there anything she is saying that is kind of frin himmy or is it all right on given you have insight? >> i think she gets painted as a
3:36 am
fringy person, if you listen to her, she's not. she says this stuff cold. she says things people on wall street and walk don't want to hear. she is speaking truth to the power a lot of the time. >> if you are elizabeth warren, why not run for president? i know the relationship with hillary clinton this idea of freezing the field, it leaves a big taste in people's mouths. >> that's a concoction of the press. >> you don't think the field is frozen by hillary clinton by seeing what she does? >> it's frozen by people afraid to get in there. you can't blame hillary for freezing the field some my view is it's going to be a primary. it's the most important office of the world. of course, it's going to be a primary. let's see who is in it. i think the debate would be good for everybody. >> who would be in it? >> martin o'malley. maybe bernie sanders. i don't know, it will be an important discussion. >> those are hardly. really. bernie sanders is a socialist
3:37 am
and martin o'malley was just handed a stunning defeat in maryland. i think he's at least -- it's hardly a mandate from o'malley to run for president based on what just happened in maryland. these are really not -- i think elizabeth warren would provide the energy, a real contrast with hillary clinton. >> i think are you a little hard on martin. he wasn't on the ballot. the democrats got their rear ends kicked pretty much all over the country. so i don't think that makes him less worthy candidate, but you know i agree there are lots of people who couldn't run. she's in her first term. that's a hard thing to do. it's a rocky road. i think the president, it was in his first term. he knows what that rocky road is about now. >> you wonder a bit about having discipline in terms of your timing. but at the same time. there were a lot of people that want her to jump in. >> two people who have become president in the last 20 years
3:38 am
did not have discipline about their time. >> right. >> bill clinton and barak obama. you jump to the head of the line. >> right. >> and everyone is saying. >> it's the seven dwarfs in the 1992 primary. >> who makes it an uneasy primary for hillary clinton? >> gee thanks. >> she says to the pulitzer prize winning author. >> everybody gets a complimentary copy of the new york post today. all right. still ahead. >> i turned mine down. >> exactly. thank you. still ahead, a 35 year u.s. army vet takes us inside the wars in iraq and afghanistan and why he said our mission in those two countries fell short. but first, welcome to the age of
3:39 am
failure. how embracing failure is the only way our society will be able to do great things. "morning joe" will be right back ♪ over 12,000 financial advisors. so, how are things? good, good. nearly $800 billion dollars in assets under care. let me just put this away. how did edward jones get so big? could you teach our kids that trick? by not acting that way. ok, last quarter... it's how edward jones makes sense of investing. ♪
3:40 am
no question about that. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any allergic reactions like rash, hives, swelling of the lips, tongue or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away.
3:41 am
ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a free 30-tablet trial. ♪ ♪ ♪ it's happening... everywhere. people are dropping their pants for underwareness, a cause to support the over 65 million people who may need the trusted protection of depend underwear. show off a pair of depend and show them it's no big deal. because hey, it's just a different kind of underwear. join us. support the cause and get a free sample of depend at underwareness.com fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. everybody knows that. well, did you know genies can be really literal?
3:42 am
no. what is your wish? no...ok...a million bucks! oh no... geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance.
3:43 am
. >> the flying delaurean in the "back to the future" series, time machines of course, have failed to get off the ground along with attempted innovations. those failures are the focus of this week's issue of the new york times magazine. titled welcome to failure age and adam is joining us now and souvendz so sad and pathetic. at the same, there might be some hope that comes out of failure? >> i'm trying to celebrate failure. >> i do that every day. >> my bake argument is we are coming out of the 20th century where the core economic logic was commoditytization. a whole bunch of innovations and 50, 60, 70 years of making the same things faster, better, it
3:44 am
ratively. >> that created a fear of failure, a commoditised economy that gave us protection and structure and stability. but that's over now. so we need to come up with new ideas, you will fail many, many times rather than -- >> what are some good examples? the greatest failures of this time in. >> the greatest failures of this time, you know, when you think about the 20th century, we all node the ed sell. if i say 20th century failure, everyone's mind goes to the edsel. it was so rare for a new project to be designed and the vast majority don't succeed. obviously, silicon valley is an ecosystem entirely built on learning again and failing. if you you a ply for a job and don't have a failure, are you seen as a stop light.
3:45 am
>> what role of the life span, you create something, a map, it will help you improve your life, something new will replace it. >> that's a big part of the essay i wrote. you look at stone axis, human things had stone axis for 200,000 years, if you find agent sumaria, it's roughly the same thing in new england. in the 20th century it's now a decade or so, a new blender or a fridge comes out. we all have that one boxy phone that you know was invented in 1936 and was still being sold in 1934. >> it's a new one. >> he has four. >> exactly. obviously trkt failure cycle is down to months. >> it seems, adam, too, if you are working at a big company,
3:46 am
it's good with the right answer. if you are an individual working at that company, are you the one that failed, there is a good chance you lose your job, silicon valley, they embrace that culture. there are things if you fail it's not going to be good for you. are these new, older industries, embracing egoes as well? >> some are. i think big manufacturing, we make big stuff. the myth of the manufacturing decline. it's job decline, not money decline, yes, i believe we need new institutions we have think of, our education system, how we think about work, pensions, who 401 ks? >> aren't we at a point that we can't fail? it seems on those issues. >> i'd say the failure of willie lohman, in "death a of a
3:47 am
salesman," you fail once in your career, your life is over. that we cone don't want. what we want is a lot of rapid thinls. >> let me end on part of what you write, which is so interesting. we are a strange species, thrill seeking, terrified of failure, eager for new adventure. we discover ways to share those risks and those reward, then we could conceivably arrive somewhere better. the pre-modern era was all rick and no reward. the corporate era had modest rewards and minimal risks. if we conquer our fear of failure, we can just maybe have both. i like it. >> i'd like you to read everything. you are on optimistic. >> exactly. we will check out the latest magazine piece. thank you so much, thanks for coming on. coming up, another wheel of fortune fail. it was enough to make host pat
3:48 am
sajack walk off the set mad. stay with us. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7 it's just i'm a little reluctant to try new things. what's wrong with trying new things? feel that in your muscles? yeah... i do... try a new way to bank, where no branches equals great rates.
3:49 am
woman: everyone in the nicu -- all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help.
3:50 am
a secure retirement. a new home. earning your diploma. providing for your family. real associates, using walmart's benefits to build better lives for their families. opportunity. that's the real walmart.
3:51 am
i know i've often called president obama a national embarrassment. i can't do that tonight.
3:52 am
because tonight he is international embarrassment. because this time it's in coin where he's attending an economic summit. once again, he has embarrassed america. first off, he wore traditional chinese garb but forgot the star fleet communicator. even worse who, when he should be over there chewing china out, he was chewing something else. >> there have also been reports in the chinese media the chinese here in beijing were offended by mr. obama's gum chewing. >> that is outrageous, why are you chewing nicorette? the one place where inhaling burnt tar is the healthier choice. >> that is, i bet here's tired, that's not polite. >> it's a little rich for a country that walks down the street hocking lugis everywhere they go. >> and wearing things. >> please.
3:53 am
>> good point but my mother did teach me never to coup gum. >> especially at dinner. >> did you see this bill clinton clip in. >> i love it. former president clinton sitting down with ellen for tv talk. it turns out he's a big fan of the tv producer shanda rooim scandal and thrillers where politicians get away with mur r murder. >> but the thing at "scandal" and "house of cards" that makes it fun to watch is i can't imagine that either a president, spacey, or the president's chief of staff on "scandal" could really get away with murder. i wish i had known about that when i was in office. think of all the opportunities i would have had. >> people you could have gotten rid of. >> so little time some many people that have it coming. >> it's so easy. >> yeah. crazy. >> so little time so many people had it coming. >> i can't believe that. >> earlier this year, shanda
3:54 am
rooims inviteled him to guest star on "scandal." . >> what else is this. >> "wheel of fortune." >> pat sajack, dodgers >> you you are watching "wheel of fortune" contestants try to solve it instead of wait. here's what happened when pat sajack is not in the mood for that hail mary. >> lee we start with you, let's have a letter. >> n. >> one n. >> you got three second to wrestle with. riding a brown horse. >> that's amazing. and it's wrong! audrey. >> d. >> one g. >> three seconds. >> riding a white horse?
3:55 am
>> who said anything about a horse? >> i thought those were excellent guesses. >> i'm confused. >> one letter? >> in three seconds you want to take a guess? >> the correct response was seeing a buddy movie. >> i thought it was a good guess. >> why didn't they ask for an e? >> it's a little lick mid-terms, people are out of sorts. >> why are we telling you about this? >> the trust in institutions is falling. coming up at the top of the hour. boy, this show, politicians from both parties recovering from some major foot in mouth disease this election cycle. we thought it was bad. the list keeps going. we got what they're saying now
3:56 am
the results are in. the great angelica huston joins us about her legendary movie career him much more can "morning joe" when we return. bonjour. comment ce va? bonjour. comment ce va? due cappuccini, per favore. domo... arigato? arigato united flies to more destinations than any other airline. namaste. over 5100 daily flights to nearly 60 countries. namaste. plus, over 230 us cities. dessert? pee-can pie.
3:57 am
pecan? yeah. okay. in any language, that's...gateway to the world friendly. to map their manufacturings at process with sticky notes and string, yeah, they were a little bit skeptical. what they do actually is rocket science. high tech components for aircraft and fighter jets. we're just their bankers, right? but financing from ge capital also comes with expertise from across ge. in this case, our top lean process engineers. so they showed us who does what, when, and where. then we hit them with the important question: why? why put the tools over there? do you really need those five steps? what if you can do it in two? whoo, that's an interesting question. ideas for improvement started pouring out. with a little help from us, they actually doubled their output speed.
3:58 am
a hundred percent bump in efficiency. if you just need a loan, just call a bank. but at ge capital, we're builders. and what we know... can help you grow. dad,thank you mom for said this oftprotecting my future.you. thank you for being my hero and my dad. military families are uniquely thankful for many things, the legacy of usaa auto insurance could be one of them. if you're a current or former military member or their family,
3:59 am
get an auto insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life. welcome back to "morning joe." a beautiful day in washington, d.c., kind of foggy. mike barnacle, howard dean, john meacham and matt lewis are all still with us. john roberts joins us from
4:00 am
washington. we have jonathan gephart. in just a few minutes. why they lost, a fascinating take on why we lost and why we continue to do so, his experiences his perspective. first, it's kind of like the gaffe show. this is the gaffe show. we have so many gaffes on both sides of the aisle to cover that it's kind of, it go es from bad to worse. so we'll start with m.i.tive. professor jonathan gruber. a man described by many as the architect of obamacare. >> he's mostly described as the architect by jonathan gruber. >> he worked on obamacare. >> he worked on obamacare. i would not call him the architect. >> an architect. >> he was speaking at the -- >> a consultant. >> he was speaking at the university of pennsylvania when he said the lack of transparency
4:01 am
in the law was instrumental in getting it past because of the quote stupidity of the american voter. >> lack of transparency is a huge advantage. calm at this time stupidity of the american voter, whatever, basically, that was critical, it's the second best argument. i wish mark was right. he can make it transparent. i'd rather have this. it's like a reporter story. i'd rather have this law than not. >> yesterday the professor apologized for his remarks. >> the comment in the video were made in an academic conference. speaking off the cuff. i bakeally spoke inappropriately. public policy that involves spending is typically less palatable tan doithan doing thi for the tax code. it would have made sense to do it like in massachusetts, which would be to give people money to toss out tear health insurance.
4:02 am
that was politically feasible. instead of the tax code. that was the only point i was making. >> first of all, i was wondering why nobody jumped all over this. meacham, is it fair to make it parallel to the huge firestorm after we talked about this first hour, tafd stockman during the reagan era, undermining reagan's policies, and that we're sort of not, except here, i don't know, i don't see it in papers. >> you can spend a whole certain moments went viral. what often happens i think the conditional explanation is ifing is a prevailing narrative, it tend to stick. so stockman back in '81, '82 was saying the emperor has no clothes in terms of reagan
4:03 am
nommics. i think obamacare is in a way it's not, details are not as front and center. >> you don't think the narrative is right of parallel? >> it's surprising, but i think that people have made up their minds about obamacare and the doesn't add to it. >> it's la ready to measure the impact in time and the tools and communication. bill ryder in the atlantic magazine, bill stockman saying we have no idea what these numbers mean about the federal budget. it was on a piece of paper in a magazine that people held in their hand and read for hours at a time. todaying bomb, it's gone, out in the nether world. whaufr whatever you say.
4:04 am
>> don't beat it to death. i want to get to the other o'pollings, the other gaffes we will list them here. let's move on while here on the subject, fair enough, that was a huge gaffe, right? we can all agree on that. i do think had it been a republican community -- >> i think stature gaffe between the office of the omb and the consultant for the -- that's why it's not a big deal. >> okay. let's try this one. on the republican side, former governor hayley barber says he is sorry for calling president obama's policies tar babies on a post-election conference call. barber once chafrd the rnc said if someone takes offense i regret it. then the context nor the connotation was intended to offense. gaffe? that is terrible. >> so much outreach for the
4:05 am
republicans. >> so -- meacham is stoic. >> putting it in context, though, it's a stup thing so they, today is more, but this is a reference to uncle remass to briar rabbit and a tar baby being known as a sticky situation him no, i think it's a stupid thing to say. it opens the door to all sorts of accusations of racism or at least being insensitive to race issues. it's entirely possible that somebody could use this term and not have negative motivation. >> the truth is, you cannot talk like that. there are things you can't say that were said in the '60s, you should know that. >> jonathan, your take on matt's take? >> look, hayley barber had a problem. he apologized in that if anyone
4:06 am
was offended kind of way. but you know, as governor dean just said, there are things that used to be you know socially acceptable to say that aren't socially acceptable today and for good reason. so someone, especially hay lay barber, son of the south, should know that saying things like tar baby and other things that he had said in the past, whistleing dixie was one of the things he said a few years ago just aren't acceptable. hayley barber is one of those people who i actually respect because he is a good politician, but when it comes to race is a huge blinder. >> while we're on the topic of race, charlie wrangle. >> my old buddy. >> he's trying to explain why he tauld tea party republicans white crackers. the long-term congressman said
4:07 am
he thought white crackers was a term of endearment. >> please. please. these people ought to know how to make the second statement rather than the nisinitial statement. >> let's go right to hayley a. term of endearment? >> please. >> i'm from the north. i know what that means when you talk leak that. >> you are from vermillion. >> go ahead. >> part of me wonders. i haven't seen the full context, not that it matters of how congressman rangle said this, part of me wonders if he was sort of joking because he does have a dry sense of humor, but there is no way on green earth congressman rangel could have possible thought calling someone white cracker was a term of endearment. >> look up "snl" from 1975,
4:08 am
chevy chase playing word aassociation interviewing -- >> okay. we'll check that out. >> every word we just discussed is used in word association 1975. 40 years ago. >> wow. okay. >> okay. i think we are done with our gaffe batch. >> the difference is these guys are xhedians and comedy is a great way to discuss difficult issues. these guys are politicians and they're not supposed to be talking leak that. >> we nigh not to use those words then are being used today. >> speaking of. speaking of bs. senator joe manchin, he's from west virginia. he and remaining red state democrats are finding themselves as the new swing votes in the senate. with new found power when asked monday by politico, whether democrats would try and block
4:09 am
and tackle republican legislation for the next two years, manchin was direct. reportedly saying that's bs, i'm not going to put up with that. talking points memo listed man chin among the six senators who could concedingly vote with republicans on key legislation. >> what do you think? >> i actually don't think it's a terrible vote to vote with republicans, if what they're proposing makes sense. >> at this point they all need to be able to live with it. >> come on, you can't be -- >> i actually heard some signs, it may be one weak post-election from mcconnell and boehner there actually might propose some legislation that might pass. >> it was so refreshing to hear conjohn mccain jed saying we want to work with the president. >> now we will find out. >> meacham. >> manchin has been interesting talking about how different it is to be in the senate and be governor and, in fact, a lot of folks think he might go book and run for governor, as he puts it.
4:10 am
you can actually do something as opposed to wondering around playing bipartisan paintball. another rule for him is he won't raise money against any incumbent and as he puts it, how can you ask somebody for a vote when you have gone into their state and tried to cost them their job. so if there is going to be action, it's going to be around people like manchin him i think it's really interesting to watch. >> matt, is that you? jonathan. go ahead. >> there is very consistent with what senator manthen has been saying since arriving in the senate. meacham touches on some of what he has been saying. he has been working with the brookeings institution and other senators up on capitol hill who were also governors to come up with this sort caucus they put a bipartisan together to come up with ways to look in areas where democrats and republicans can come together to make the senate
4:11 am
work again him so bakeally, what you have there is sort of a former governor's frustrated caucus who are used to getting things done him then they get to the senate and they don't do anything at all. >> before we get to our next guest. we have new numbers of the mid-term election with voters showing no sign of boyer's remorse. according to gallup, 53% want republicans in congress to have more influence than president obama. 36% would prefer the white house set the priorities. two years ago, when the president was reelected he had a four-point edge on who should set the nation's course. while more voters today say the u.s. would be better off than republicans, nearly half believe party control won't make a difference we will see, meek. >> meika, we have news out of airaq, people are dead, carried out by sunni militants, daniel
4:12 am
bolger, retired general, he helped command posts in iraq and afghanistan. he is the author of why we lost. the general's inside account of iraq and afghanistan. thank you have much nor joining us. i read your piece in the "time's." let me ask you, sir, do you think the mission that we gave the young men and women who served in both iraq and afghanistan was clearly defined be i the command, by people like you and not you specifically but did we fail them? did we fail the young men and women who served this country? >> meek. a great question. do i include myself in those who fail to define this mission properly and carry out my responsibles as a commander. we say in the army that a commander is responsible for everything his unit does or fails to do. when i look at iraq and afghanistan today, unfortunately, i got to admit failure. that's not the fault of the great young men and women,
4:13 am
talented, brave, willing to sacrifice. they did everything we asked of them. i think we asked the wrong things. >> also in the time's piece, i have not yet read the book, but the surge, general petraeus' surge in anbar province, which was met with great acclaim, american media and the pentagon is a huge success. was it really a success, a victory or was it more or less a holding action in andar province? >> i think it's the latter. at the time, obviously, nature surge is temporary. the type of war we are fighting against these mytant ensurgents is a long-term prospect and so a temporary surge is going to alleviate the symptoms for while. like giving a bunch of aspirin, once you take it away the fever spikes up, all have you done is deal with symptoms. >> general, do you feel there was not a comprehensive plan once there was a recognition of
4:14 am
being adrift to figuring out what to do? >> well, there was no plan. the plan essentially was to keep doing what we were doing. >> that ends up with the war of attrition with americans trying to go through villages and sort out which of the military age males might be the enemy. that's a losing proposition. if you fight insurgents, the local people have to take the lead. we have to be in a supportive role. trying to be with americans that doesn't work. we learned it twice now in iraq and afghanistan. we can't afford do do that again. >> meacham. >> what do you think the legacy at this point will be? >> i hope it will be a degree of humidity and recognizing our limits. i have to say i'm a little bitten couraged by the way we are going after isis. it's not that smashing desert storm type victory that our forces are designed for. but it's a recognition that the iraqis have to lead and as our president said, it's going to be a long-term effort, multiple numbers of years, that's a refreshing if sobering effort
4:15 am
from our commander in chief. >> general, what do you think realistically the prospects are for training or retraining in this case, the iraqi army as it currently exists. >> i've spent a lot of time training the iraqi army and afghan, for that matter, i will tell you, it's a jenational effort to rebuild an army. the iraqi army at present is showing the same tendencys within we not them, which is not very well disciplined or well led. if we spend time with them, if we make a long-term commitment to training them, we will have a good result. we seen that before. i point to the armed forces in south korea, they were not too good, but are very good right now. that's what we are talking about. multiple decades of commitment to retrain their leaders. >> the book is why we lost, a general's inside account of the iraq and afghanistan wars, retired leiutenant general daniel bolger, thank you so much
4:16 am
for being on the show. thank you. jonathan capeheart, thank you very well, matt lewis, thank you very much. still ahead on "morning joe," he survived an onsluth of negative ads against him in the mid-term election. senator elect tom tillis joins us and then actress angelica huston will be here with great behind the scene stories. and one of the most prolific authors of all time, stephen kings joins us in our 8:00 hour. plus how one 24 hour-year-old man took his job a little too seriously. we'll be right back. aniston ] we what i'm wearing, i tell them aveeno®. because beautiful skin goes with everything. [ female announcer ] aveeno® daily moisturizing lotion has active naturals® oat
4:17 am
with five vital nutrients naturally found in healthy skin. where do i wear aveeno®? everywhere. aveeno® daily moisturizing lotion.. and try the body wash too. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results™.
4:18 am
aveeno®. i'm just looking over the company bills.up? is that what we pay for internet? yup. dsl is about 90 bucks a month. that's funny, for that price with comcast business, i think you get like 50 megabits. wow that's fast. personally, i prefer a slow internet.
4:19 am
there is something about the sweet meditative glow of a loading website. don't listen to the naysayer. switch to comcast business today and get 50 megabits per second for $89.95. comcast business. built for business. . >> all right. time to look at the morning papers the st. louis post-dispatch a ferguson grand jury is nearing a decision in the deadly shooting of an
4:20 am
unarmed black teenager. the state of missouri is already bracing for possible arrest itself. multiple law enforcement agencies will be on call including the national guard. violent protests erupted in august after a white police officer shot and killed 18-year-old michael brown. the governor says those types of demonstrations can not be repeated. >> these measures are not being taken because we are convinced violence will occur but because we have a responsibility to prepare for any contingency. the public demands and i demand that. this is america. people have a right to express tear views and grievances, but they do not have the right to put tear fellow citizens or their property at risk. as i said before, violence will not be tolerated. the residents and businesses of this region will be protected.
4:21 am
>> all right. so we look at this out of the new york daily news, fork city doctor craig spencer released from hospital after being declared free of the ebola virus. his release means there are no known cases in the country. yesterday the government of malala yousafzama mali reported a second case. the u.s. state department built a mock city in rural virginia to train agents who protect diplomat itself over seas, the city is complete with shops, offices, churches and a mock u.s. embassy. >> wow. >> the agents that train there spend three days learning how to deal with every attack. bloomberg business week is out
4:22 am
with new rarpgings for american business schools and duke university is no. 1. u pep, university of chicago, stanford and columbia round out the top five 45r vard slips from two to eight. >> all right. we look at the independent. a young pan buys fine iphones for an elaborate wedding proposal. take a look at this. he buys the phone for this proposal. gets rejected by his girlfriend. >> what? >> it happened in chosen on singles day. this is look our valentine's day, people find out who tear crush is. they make large romantic jess cures. with friends and family, he pops the question in the middle of a heart made out of iphones. he reportedly spent $99,000 on the phones. she is apparently a samsung check. shelves not down.
4:23 am
>> it was the 5. >> she said no. >>. yeah. >> after all things public. >> down with the samsung. >> not happy. >> show me the receipts. >> i feel bad for him. >> we didn't mention the ring. he probably popped money on the iphones and gave a cheap ring. >> i wouldn't want to be behind him in the return line. in the huffington post, a man put the request of a co-worker to watch their plant very seriously. 23-year-old eric freeman documented every moment. he and the plant posed on wux, on the slide at the park. taking coffee breaks and even in the restroom. >> i think the deer with the plastic thing on his head is better than that story.
4:24 am
>> so we're not allowed to show this. >> that's my deer. it's the grossest thing i have ever seen. >> can we show it like that? >> no, just. >> our girls watch as family. we don't get it. it's sort of the culture. this really bums me out. one person in the room got it. >> i got it. >> it's really, it's just nobody actually wants to see all that. is there one guy in this room that needs to see that? >> well, who hasn't already seen it. meacham. >> i just want to say. . >> show it. it's in the paper. show it. >> i can show it? >> i don't know. >> no. >> hey. >> up next. >> good luck. it's your career. >> i want to say, my people are ruining the sank sanctity of marriage? >> up next. >> she's a mom.
4:25 am
>> oh. >> up next, he was a part of the republican wave that overtook the senate. north carolina's senator elect tom tillis joins "morning joe" next. to map their manufacturings at process with sticky notes and string, yeah, they were a little bit skeptical.
4:26 am
what they do actually is rocket science. high tech components for aircraft and fighter jets. we're just their bankers, right? but financing from ge capital also comes with expertise from across ge. in this case, our top lean process engineers. so they showed us who does what, when, and where. then we hit them with the important question: why? why put the tools over there? do you really need those five steps? what if you can do it in two? whoo, that's an interesting question. ideas for improvement started pouring out. with a little help from us, they actually doubled their output speed. a hundred percent bump in efficiency. if you just need a loan, just call a bank. but at ge capital, we're builders. and what we know... can help you grow.
4:27 am
ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you outlive your money? uhhh. no, that can't happen. that's the thing, you don't know how long it has to last. everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive.. confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor can get the real answers you need. well, knowing gives you confidence. start building your confident retirement today.
4:28 am
4:29 am
. >> joining us now from washington, republican senator elect from north carolina, tom tillis. he defied polls to turn it in favor of the gop. we congratulate you, welcome to the show this morning. my first question to you, we will go around the table, different perspectives is exit polls show voters in your state favor raising the minimum wage, so what are you going to do about that? >> i'm going to ask my state legislators who have the:30 to do that to take that up and work with businesses and do it in a way that's responsible. i don't think we need a national solution to all these problems. that's one of the problems with what's going on in washington there are a number of things, leg latory state reform we did to make our economy work. we node to do that at the national level. a lot can be done with the
4:30 am
states the they have responsible leaders. >> senator, you were speaker of the house before, you could have done it if you wanted to do it in the state. how come you didn't? >> because at the time we had one of the highest tax regulatory environments in the country. we went from 44 to 16. we are getting the economy back on track and, quite honestly, i think it will become less relevant because our job growth is exceeding many states, if we have more demand for jobs, will you have higher wages that will make the minimum wage more irrelevant. >> senator, in your first few weeks, months in the senate beginning the next session in january, what would you consider a larger priority, finding a place for the under ploed and unemployed to get work or repealing obamacare? >> well, i think have you to have several tracks going. there has been inaction over the
4:31 am
past several years that you are going to have to have several things moving at the same. there has to be a solution to replace obamacare and solve the problem. >> why? >> because it's fiscally unsustainable. we need to remember we are talking about something that will add to the debt, nearly a trillion dollars. it will threaten doctors and hospitals to the tune of $700 billion out of medicare. have you enrollment numbers and other things that raise questions about whether or not it's fiscally sustainable. that could potentially threaten what you can do for the very people we are trying to provide a solution to. at the same, there are dozens of bills that are job creating bills, tax reform, things that can get the business more on track him the more we are able to create economic activity the easier the problems come to fix the economy and the debt. >> meacham. >> do you favor something along the line of simpson bowles to
4:32 am
attack these issues? >> i think you have to keep in mind, when simpson bowles was published. that report had a standby title call the moment of truth. so if it was bad at 10 trillion, it's really bad at 17 trillion. we're going to have to make tough decisions like we did in north carolina that the people may not understand what we need to do is make sure we explain it to them along the way how it gets the economy back on track. it also attracts the national security. the u.s. a debt to our national security. >> speaking of national security are you willing to follow social and get rid of the deficit? >> i think to do proper debt reduction, everything has to be looked at. everything has to be looked at
4:33 am
in a possible way. we have to maintain health issues, people who can't fend for government. we understand these are very dangerous times in the world. we have to protect our soviet and security but also have various places around the globe. >> thank you for being on the show. >> i'm happy to be from the state that hosts duke university top mba program. >> no 1. congratulations to that, too. thank you, take care. up next, a disease that is one of the country's worst silent killers, what it is and what is being done about it neighborhood, plus, angelica huston tells us which of her roles was like having a dirty little secret. we'll be right back. so ally bank really has no hidden fees on savings accounts?
4:34 am
that's right.
4:35 am
it's just that i'm worried about you know "hidden things..." ok, why's that? no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates. ...the getaway vehicle!
4:36 am
for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this. ♪ ♪ just take a closer look. it works how you want to work. with a fidelity investment professional... or managing your investments on your own. helping you find new ways to plan for retirement. and save on taxes where you can. so you can invest in the life that you want today. tap into the full power of your fidelity greenline. call or come in today for a free one-on-one review.
4:37 am
. >> all right. there are two major breakthroughs in china, the u.s. and coin have agreed to major deals involving pollution and military cooperation. the deals are seen as a sign of that youing between u.s. and chosen relations, stumbling blocks remain, especially when it comes to cyber security and human rights. >> i described to him why it's so important for us to speak out for the freedoms that we believe are universal. rights that we believe are the birth right of all men and women wherever they live, whether in new york or paris or hong kong. >> the things are still icy between president obama and russia's vladmir putin. the cell len released photos of their 33 offhand meetings. the world leaders have been
4:38 am
chastised for a lack of propriety as well. president obama apparently used his own limosine and chewed gum while entering the summit him it was widely pand, apparently, just this morning the full reports indicates he was chewing gum in a meeting with the national people's congress. >> get over it. >> i love stuff leak this. it's all so silly. then there were fireworks in the chinese media over a pyrotechnic display when he put a shawl ore the first lady. it was scrubbed by chinese sensors. i don't understand it. >> it was too forward. too forward to make that approach to the first lady to do that. although, she accepted it graciously. >> he didn't give her a back rub like america merck el got one. a shawl. >> it was apparently too civ
4:39 am
schiffal russ. how to control type ii diabetes and reverse free diabetes using free simple diet and lifestyle changes. >> thank you. >> there are so many serious illnesses if you really look at diet and lifestyle, you really can have an impact on them. >> oh, absolutely. that's probably the biggest factor that we can control in all of health. everything from heart disease to diabetes, to aulgs heimaners maybe. >> with type ii, the numbers are bad in terms of how many people have it and also deaths. >> they're incredible. almost 100 million have diabetes. it accounts for over a quarter million deaths. we talk about health care. the cost of health care. if we can change this, it's the long-term costs that is amazing. >> meek. >> what is prediabetes? >> all these technical definitions, if your blood sugar fasting is between zero and 125,
4:40 am
that's we have diabetes. diabetes is when it's over 125. it doesn't seem like a beg deal. if you have prediabetes, have you two to three times of a heart attack of 94 neuropathy. given. >> given the programmers, wouldn't nearly everyone have prediabetes? >> european million people have prediabetes. we are taking it for granted. nowadays it's like being overweight is the norm. we almost come to accept that. we shouldn't be, it's dangerous. >> no, let me ask you about this. i'm looking at in your books even recipes, it points to a complete overhaul of your diet. but it seems leak looking alt these recipes these are just for everybody. >> they are for everybody. it doesn't need to be difficult. it doesn't need to be scary. you don't have to sacrifice. we need to change the way we eat
4:41 am
and incorporate more natural things, actually the key word is fiber. you can eat carbohydrates, if you eat them in things that contain fiber, they go slowly into your bloodstream. >> how do we get a better hand him on habits, learn habits we are passings down to our kids, one thing you talk about in the book the blood sugar budget. >> correct. >> how do we become more conscientious about blood sugar and knowing where we need to be at all times. >> hopefully, the book will help. the first part is education. we are so set on routines that we really have to change the whole para.com of how we deal with food. that's a very difficult thing. i'm the first one when i see fast food, my instinct is to go in there. you have to relearn that. it's small pieces, it won't be overnight. >> it's better coming from you, a doctor. isn't there a sense because you
4:42 am
say people have to really change the way they eat. their mind is set to want food. it's also, you go to a grocery store or a restaurant, although we are doing better, and there is nothing for you if you really want to eat well. i mean, hasn't society to an extent the way our food is delivered to the american people, hasn't it tricked us into eating badly? in there absolutely. there are two things, i have a lot of chefs, they say make a good meal, that's fat and salt. >> right. >> i know, that's where you really have to be assertive, which is what is difficult. i disagree. there is always something healthy at a restaurant. you just have to ask for it and fight for it. >> weren't you in mcdonald's? you can find something healthy they are working really hard to have, you know, all sorts of options there. you can definitely eat a healthy meal. the problem is you are smelling the fries. >> absolutely. >> and they're addictive. the salt and the fat takes over
4:43 am
parts of the brain. that's why i'm saying i feel like it's very hard to make good decisions. >> it is very difficult. if i had more control. we tax things that are dangerous for us, like cigarettes and things like that. you know taxing bad food is very taboo, you are interfering with the whole economics system. >> are some people more susceptible to die boaabetes? >> there is a genetic component. the hispanics, two times more likely to have diabetes. african-americans, also two times more likely. so whether it's socioeconomic because there is a lower income and bad food is inexpensive, but there is definitely a genetic component. it doesn't mean if your parents have it you are going to get it. >> if i look at die boats friendly recipes, the way people should eat if they could. >> correct. >> how do we create a world for ourselves in which we can eat
4:44 am
this way. i think it's not as easy as it seems. >> it isn't. that's a lot. but we will start one step at a time, which is continuing to hammer the message home. we are hoping when people see these recipes, which are created by a professor of nutrition, they can sa this, xpt i can substitute this for this, olive oil for butter. >> what i learned in writing a book about food obsession a couple years ago, that if you do this, your tastebuds will be retrained to want this food. >> absolutely. >> you have to go through a couple weeks of tough. >> i don't know if any of you have gone through the atkins diet. i have always had a problem with my weight. gow through two weeks of detox, you get af the shuck ars, you are ready to kill everybody. >> you have to have, you almost can't stop thinking about it. >> how is there a way for us in
4:45 am
regular dietary habits to understand and recognize where we need to be blood sugar wise? >> okay. you need to go to a physician, first of all. you into ed to know that the beautiful tests, something an a 1 c which measures the amount of shuck ar gound bo under to your blood cells. it will tell you where it's been. if it's above 6.5%, you have a problem. that's the key test. >> for men is it about carrying weight in our mid-section and the women carrying extra weight? >> mid-section and hips. yeah, that and high blood pressure is the biggest problem. so that's where we do tend to carry it. >> is there anything, doctor, where you can do about reviveing john meacham? john is sitting there thinking of that happy meal. >> do you sometimes feel as though you're an anti-smoking person since 1962?
4:46 am
>> yes, absolutely. >> see. >> there you go, barnacle. >> i think they're going to become like toke him do you think i'm crazy? >> i don't think you are crazy. when people really look at it, they can. >> i thought she was asking me if someone was going to sue me. >>. i think it's fat and salt. >> we done look at it. we were talking about doing some and ethnic analysis bodegas and all these things and what you can get. >> alex, all right. he's telling me to go to break. he's getting mean. the book is "the diabetes solution." thank you. we can talk for hours, alex won't let us. still ahead arc young man. >> meacham won't be quiet. >> this man 24 hour-years-old left the civilized world to be alone with nature in the alaskan wilderness. it was portrayed in the popular movie "into the wild." now his sister is revealing the real person he left behind. also ahead, governor scott
4:47 am
walker has a new controversial plan to drug test people receiving government assistance s. he pushing the littles of power. next, angelica huston opens up with her volatile relationship with jack richardson and jack o'neal. she joins the stable when we come right back. she reminds you every day. but your erectile dysfunction-that could be a question of blood flow. cialis for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment is right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is also the only daily ed tablet approved to treat symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, get medical help right away
4:48 am
for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any symptoms of an allergic reaction, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a free 30-tablet trial. which means it's time thfor the volkswagens here, sign-then-drive event. for practically just your signature, you could drive home for the holidays in a german-engineered volkswagen. like the sporty, advanced new jetta and the well-crafted all-new golf. if you're wishing for a new volkswagen this season just about all you need is a finely tuned... pen. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit and zero first month's payment on select new volkswagen models. woman: everyone in the nicu -- all the nurses wanted to watch him
4:49 am
when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help.
4:50 am
4:51 am
last night, you were unhinged. you were like some desperate howling demon. you frightened me. do it again. >> how's your love life? >> none of your business. >> it's all a front. you're working some angle and don't tell me you're not 'cause i wrote the book. >> you still running playback money for the mob? >> that's me, that's who i am. >> let's do it. >> all the lights on? >> yeah, right here on the oriental. with all the lights on. >> mamma mia. >> those were just a few of angelica houston's many roles
4:52 am
during her legendary movie career. her new memoir. >> i love the title, "watch me." >> you're amazing. >> you are amazing. the title, "watch me." >> i like it. >> tony richardson, who was a great british film director, gave me my first real job which was understudy in "hamlet" in england in 1969. >> those were a couple of bizarre references. >> they were. >> trying to make sense of them -- >> okay, that's quite a way to start, okay. >> yeah, but then i guess about five years later, i was at a party in los angeles and tony was there and he had this great voice. it was very much like this. he said, poor little you, you're never going to do anything with your life. so much talent, so little to show for it. i thought, "watch me." and that's how that came about.
4:53 am
>> i like it. there's a lot in here. your relationships with certain men. ryan o'neal. you're finally talking about that. why and -- it looks fairly abusive from what i've read. >> i don't want to classify ryan as simply a one-dimensional abusive person, but yes, there was abuse in the relationship. my feeling is that basically violence has no place in relationships. and if there's one girl out there who's in a bad relationship, she should get out of it. >> there's another thread through your love life, jack nicholson. you visited with him in different periods of your life. but there's one part in the first dating period. you call yourself tragically gullible. at that point, you also talk about the potential of marriage which he really broke your heart
4:54 am
over. do you find looking back he was one of the true loves of your life? >> oh, yeah, jack was definitely one of the true loves of my life and continues to be the love of my life. he's an extraordinary man, a brilliant man. i think, you know, that line shouldn't be misinterpreted. there's a line in there where he says marry you, are you kidding? it was a joke. it wasn't really as derogatory as -- >> you say that now but then you cried for three days. >> of course, it's a terrible thing for a girl to hear. >> i'm going to make you retell the story again. your first day on the set of "the royal tannenbaums," your scenes with gene hackman. >> wes anderson is the director. i'm extremely nervous. it's a freezing cold january day. i'm introduced to gene hackman would i have to slap across the face in the first scene. so basically there are a few
4:55 am
rehearsals and i kind of bat him around the lapel and so forth. knowing that this moment is coming up. and yes, wes called action. >> listen, i'm not dying, but i need some time. a month or so. okay. i want us to -- >> what's wrong with you? >> i saw this big red mark coming. this welt coming. like, oh, he's going to eat me alive. but he was really sweet and thank god we didn't have to go for another take. >> do you have a favorite movie, a favorite project, looking back? >> that's got to be hard. >> i love the grifters because i got so many great lines. >> read about people killing people and all that. but when that happens, my god. >> i got to play opposite joan
4:56 am
cusack and annette bening, right at the top of their game. >> the book is called "watch me." you are so nice and normal. you are. >> what did you expect? >> what did you think? >> vampy and diva-like and a big like in the room like everything would change when she walked in. >> it didn't. >> no. it all changed for the better. except when you slapped joe but he deserved it. thank you so much. the book looks amazing. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe."
4:57 am
and for many, it's a struggle to keep your a1c down. so imagine, what if there was a new class of medicine that works differently to lower blood sugar? imagine, loving your numbers. introducing once-daily invokana®. it's the first of a new kind of prescription medicine that's used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. invokana® is a once-daily pill that works around the clock to help lower a1c. here's how: the kidneys allow sugar to be absorbed back into the body. invokana® reduces the amount of sugar allowed back in, and sends some sugar out through the process of urination. and while it's not for weight loss,
4:58 am
it may help you lose some weight. invokana® can cause important side effects, including dehydration, which may cause some people to have loss of body water and salt. this may also cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak especially when you stand up. other side effects may include kidney problems, genital yeast infections, urinary tract infections, changes in urination, high potassium in the blood, or increases in cholesterol. do not take invokana® if you have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis or if allergic to invokana® or its ingredients. symptoms of allergic reaction may include rash, swelling, difficulty breathing or swallowing. if you experience any of these symptoms, stop taking invokana® and call your doctor right away or go to the nearest hospital. tell your doctor about any medical conditions, medications you are taking, and if you have kidney or liver problems. using invokana® with a sulfonylurea or insulin may increase risk of low blood sugar.
4:59 am
it's time. lower your blood sugar with invokana®. imagine loving your numbers. ask your doctor about invokana®. wethey were a littlehorizons to mbit skeptical.ss, what they do actually is rocket science. but at ge capital we also bring expertise from across ge, like lean process engineers we asked who does what, when, where, and why that step first? ideas for improvement started pouring out. with a little help from us, they actually doubled their output speed. if you just need a loan, just call a bank. at ge capital, we're builders. and what we know... can help you grow.
5:00 am
president obama finds himself in beijing for apec, the asia pacific economic cooperation. summit, incredibly dry economic conference dedicated to promoting global prosperity through the -- what the, who the, wait, who break, out joseph and the amazing technicolor drummer corps for the economic summit? what, fireworks? fireworks that spell out apec? are you kidding me! although to be fair, china does the whole fireworks thing for pretty much anything.
5:01 am
they love a good firework. >> good morning, everybody. it is wednesday, november 12th. okay, gentlemen, close the news. >> wow. >> good morning. >> kim car dikardashian apparen naked again. how surprising. with us naked on set we have mike barnacle, former governor of vermont. it's not even attractive. >> she's a republican. >> oh, howard dean. >> right to the political. >> in washington, we have senior contributor of the daily caller and columnist for the week elise. good to have you all on board. sort of clean-up time on capitol hill as democrats and republicans are trying to stem the bleeding from their own gaffes. it's a term that michael kinsly defined as when someone in washington gets caught telling the truth. this obamacare story which i saw yesterday and i'm surprised it
5:02 am
didn't emerge. but today it definitely is because the most serious of gaffes came from m.i.t. professor jonathan gruber, a man described by many as the architect of obamacare. speaking at the university of pennsylvania last year when he said the lack of transparency in the law was instrumental in getting it passed because of the, quote, stupidity of the american voter. >> the lack of transparency is a huge political advantage. basically, call it the stupidity of the american voter or whatever but basically that was really, really critical. it's the second best argument. look, i wish we could make it all transparent but i'd rather have this law than not. the things i'd rather have changed but i'd rather have this law than not. >> i don't think you say that right? that might be a problem. >> the problem is not that he said it, the problem is that he thinks it. that the core -- i'm serious. the core problem. put together by a bunch of
5:03 am
elitists who don't fundamentally understand the american people. that's watt problem is. >> now we're covering it. the professor apologized. take a look. >> the comment in the video was made at an academic conference. speaking off the cuff. basically spoke inappropriately. public policy that involves spending is typically less politically palatable than policy that involves doing things to the tax code. it would have made more sense to do obamacare the way we did in massachusetts which is give people money to offset the cost of their health insurance. that was politically feasible. and so instead it was done to the tax code. >> it's interesting dynamic. this broke yesterday. we kind of, you know, were trying to get to it. nobody covered it except for some right wing -- had this been -- had this been a republican, what do you think would have happened? >> well, he is -- this century's version of david stockman who
5:04 am
was ronald reagan's original budget director in 1981, in an extensive magazine piece in the old atlantic magazine by the former washington post editor. david stockman sat down with him. he was reagan's budget director. sat down with bill grider many, many times, explants the budget. said basically none of us understands what any of these numbers are about. >> let me guess, implying that president helpingen had any idea what the numbers were about. >> i think there was a huge firestorm. >> exactly. >> that's my point. >> david stockman was the direct of the office of management and budget. it's slightly different. >> he's one of the architects, is he not you can't define him as the architect. >> he likes to think he's one of the architects. he did play a significant role as the --
5:05 am
>> if he's saying that out loud, that's a reflection of things -- >> i agree, i agree. if you're ronald reagan's office of management budget director you have direct access to the president. this guy probably had some access to the president. i guess for the most part he didn't. i'm not squeezing the language. it's terrible. it does dishts how we got this bill which is for a complicated -- >> it's bad. we have to look at how we cover things on each side the aisle here. elise did cover it. ways your take? what did you find? >> well, i think we have to remember the nancy pelosi comment that makes this jonathan gruber comment all the more painful for people on the republican side. remember, pelosi had that press conference weather she said we have to pass this bill to see what's in it and i think that has continued to echo through campaign ads, four or five years
5:06 am
out. again, this makes republicans extra sensitive to the idea that health care reform was concocted by democrats in a room in a kind of conspiratorial way. i'm not saying that is what happened, that is what republicans say happened. i think that's an impression that's very difficult for companies due to these comments. i think democrats need to be much more careful because clearly there was an open process. than a lot of republicans believe. anybody covering the formulation of the bill for months and months can tell you the pieces were reported on. they were worked out. republicans might not think they had enough input. but these comments are very damaging. they contribute to this idea that obamacare was hatched in a dark room and it was a conspiracy. >> howard? >> first of all, one of the reasons the republicans didn't have any input is they didn't want any input. for them not to complain they didn't have any input into the
5:07 am
health care law and all they were try to do is sabotage it is a bit much. it is the law. there's about 15 million people that have health care insurance because of obamacare. there are plenty of things that -- we can go through them, i like to do that. but it is the law. it's worked. i don't think if we're tying this in any way into the debacle last week that it had much to do with it. i think this is basically beating a dead horse. >> well, i -- okay, so while we're on gaffes. on the republican side, former governor haley barbour says he's sorry for calling president obama's policies tar babies. >> come on. >> on a post-election conference call. >> how do you do that? >> barbour tells politico, if someone takes offense, i regret it but, again, neither the context nor the inno tation was
5:08 am
supposed to offend. congressman rangel is trying to explain why he called tea party republicans white crackers. oh, my god. is this like -- we're not the onion. we swear. this is true. in an interview, the longtime congressman now says he thought white crackers was a term of endearment? >> no. >> who are these people? >> thuis must be the air pollution from beijing affecting people's brains. unbelievable. >> before comparing tea party republicans to jim crow segregation -- what, what, what? i'm going to go. i'm going. willie. it's all yours. >> it's always the explanation afterward. >> i don't even know. it was like a cascade of stories that just -- >> really, wow.
5:09 am
>> hey, matt lewis, let's get you in this conversation if you want to be in this conversation. i mean, those last two were obviously very ugly comments. the first one talking about obamacare has more of a -- more implication for what's happening in this country because of a law that was passed. what's your reaction to that from gruber? >> obviously, it's horrible things that he said. i think it's a gaffe precisely because he's telling the truth, you know. whether it was president obama's promise that if you like your doctor, you can keep it, if you like your insurance plan, you can keep it, or whether it was the sort of behind the scenes cornhusker kickback, the way this bill was sort of pushed through, you know, one party pushed it through. it's been really ugly and messy. now we certainly have an indication that the american public was misled. if they knew what was in this bill, they probably wouldn't have supported it. i do have to say, as damaging as this scandal is, i think more
5:10 am
importantly it's something else that gruber said, which is that, you know, he knew in advance that states who didn't sort of create their own exchange wouldn't be eligible for these tax subsidies. that, in fact, it's not only scandalous but relevant as we lead into a supreme court decision which could potentially damage obamacare. i think grub, there's the gaffe, the more politically toxic gaffe and then the substantive gaffe that i think is probably going to be with us a lot longer. >> let's move on. wisconsin governor scott walker is pushing ahead with the controversial plan to drug test recipients of public assistant. the proposal would apply to people receiving unemployment benefits and food stamps. a spokesman for the governor says he will spend the next several weeks waiting for his cabinet to create a specific
5:11 am
proposal. both alabama and missouri passed bills that allowed drug tests if a applicant was suspected of using drugs. in 2010, at least 12 states failed to pass bills calling for suspiciousless drug testing across the board. wisconsin is one of five states that currently perform drug tests on public assistant applicants who have felony drug convictions. so, howard, actually, you're perfect for this. what do you think of the concept? there's a lot of -- there's possibly proof that it's unconstitutional. >> and yet, this is -- >> the gop is not content with waging war on women, they're now waging war on poor people. >> why? >> because they're signaling -- you're getting unemployment and that means you're working and now you've lost your job so that makes you a suspect for using drugs. >> what if you're using drugs? >> what if i'm using drugs? what if barnacle's using drugs?
5:12 am
does that mean we just get a drug test? that means -- the police are entitled to just grab us off the street and -- >> for the sake of argument, let me ask you, if you're going to be receiving money from the government, isn't it okay for the government to say, we'll give you the money, we'll support you -- >> let's tax everybody on wall street who's getting all the -- >> you can't -- >> -- drug tests right down here on wall street for people getting tax breaks. that's government money too. what the hell's going on? you can't take citizens who pay taxes, lose their jobs and now test them for drugs. this is a war on poor people. scott walker is too immature to be a governor and i'm amazed he's done as well as he has politically. >> i do understand what governor dean is saying and it does sort of -- the libertarian in me is a little bit concerned, you know, once government has a say in
5:13 am
your life and they increasingly do in all of our lives, all of a sudden there are expectations you would have to comply. if the citizens of wisconsin decide that this is appropriate, i think we should, you know, i'm not going to throw it out. i mean, look, it's there money. it's not the government's money. it's coming from the taxpayers. so i'm a little bit conflicted on this. i don't think it's like an orwellian thing that we're making it out to be either. >> there is a fundamental misunderstanding of what it means to be poor in this country. and i think the fundamental misunderstanding of this concept is held by too many people in various state legislatures. nobody elects to be poor. nobody has a child and says, i hope this child grows up to be poor. >> i totally agree with you. >> why don't we drug test the members of each and every legislature in this country before they vote on these
5:14 am
cockamamy bills? if you're a huge insurance company, you're looking for a break -- >> maybe we can cut a deal with walker so all the members of the legislature and the governor himself gets drug teted on the same schedule -- aren't they on welfare? they're getting taxpayer's money and they're doing nothing, right? >> still ahead on "morning joe," he's written more than 50 books and he's still going. best selling author stephen king is here with his latest novel. plus, calvin klein uses a size 10 model in its latest campaign. why some are insisting on calling her plus sized. first, here's bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> doesn't look plus sized to me. let's talk about the cold. i think we're at the peak of it. wyoming is just off the charts ridiculous for november. for wyoming and colorado, one of the coldest november days you've ever seen. let's get into the number details. casper, wyoming, the sun is coming up. it is minus 16. that's the temperature. not even the windchill. you did drop to negative 21
5:15 am
which tied your all-time november low temperature. this is an historical now cold arctic outbreak. the cold covers about half the country at least. it was below freezing this morning. here's your windchill. a big goose egg in amarillo. negative 26 in casper is the lowest i've been able to find. the cold air now starting to seep into areas like detroit, indianapolis, pittsburgh this afternoon. we also have some snow in denver. denver's probably the worst forecast in the entire country out there. your temperature will be 4 to 6 degrees for your thigh temperature. kind of an ugly day there on the front range. as far as the other areas, i think we have a picture of the denver area too. some of those pretty snowflakes coming down. you can't tell how cold it is out there but you can see some of those. the other thing i wanted to mention is the fog in the northeast. we've had some accidents up in massachusetts. still pretty dense around the boston area. philadelphia, about a third of a
5:16 am
mile too. so be careful and enjoy one more warm day in the east because that chilly air arrives tomorrow. again, it's chilly. it's not the stuff wyoming's dealing with. you're watching "morning joe." leave you with a shot of new york times square. 65. get away with shorts for one more day. tomorrow, you're going to need the coat. "morning joe" will be right back. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you have enough money to live life on your terms? i sure hope so. with healthcare costs, who knows. umm... everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor.... can get the real answers you need.
5:17 am
start building your confident retirement today. oats go! wow! go power oats! go! go power! yayyyy! so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are24/7branches? it's just i'm a little reluctant to try new things. what's wrong with trying new things? feel that in your muscles? yeah... i do... try a new way to bank, where no branches equals great rates. really. it's not worth it. no worries. i got this. ♪ i got all the time in the world ♪ (vo) a 2.7 gigahertz turbo processor. kevlar fiber durability. turbo charge for up to 8 hours of battery in just 15 minutes. introducing droid turbo by motorola
5:18 am
switch now and get $150 credit. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, shopping online is as easy as it gets. carpenters and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. start shopping online from a list of top-rated providers. visit angieslist.com today.
5:19 am
what's her problem? i don't -- no. >> leading from behind.
5:20 am
>> okay. twice now in 20 minutes you've used that line. sorry. sorry. go ahead. why would she do that? disgusting. actually, it's not attractive. does anybody in the room think the shot of kim kardashian in the paper today is attractive? howard. ooh. gross. gross. it's gross. sometimes too much, people, leave a little mystery. let's take a look at the -- am i being a scold? i don't get it. i mean -- i guess i'm just old. >> we can't even show it either. >> we can't even show it. but it's not -- it's -- this is crazy. >> this is incredible. "the new york times," get me through this, police are investigating a bold armed jewelry robbery. the diamond district just about three blocks south of our building here in midtown. willie, was it you? about 2:30 yesterday afternoon,
5:21 am
police say -- this is actually frightening. a man posing as a delivery worker entered a jewelry business on west 47th street. while an accomplice acted as a lookout. the disguised thief then allegedly pistol whipped an employee and forced him to open a safe while he held four others at gunpoint. when a fifth employee entered the office, the men fled the scene. making off with an estimated $2 million in jewelry and watches. >> the veterans day parade goes up fifth avenue a half a block from where that is. the place -- i was there yesterday, crawling with cops and military personnel and these guys walk right in the front door in broad daylight, incredible, incredible. the dallas morning news. this morning, about $300 million miles away, a european space probe named rosetta is attempting to land on a comet. there's an issue with the landing system so it's trying to use screws and a harpoon to keep from bouncing off the comet's
5:22 am
icy dusty surface. the landing itself takes about seven hours. because rosetta is so far away, it takes the radio transmitter 28 minutes to transmit to earth. >> the new face of a calvin klein line is proving to be be a controversial one. normal looking woman. how fantastic. the model is size 10. she's actually thin. >> that's what i thought. >> i'm just going with it here. what's the problem? >> okay, her selection as the representative of the new perfectly fit line, yeah, she's perfectly fit, maybe a little thin, looks groundbreaking. an article in elle magazine calls the model what the industry would call plus size. >> where is this coming from? >> are you making sure we have a generation of anorexics? seriously. she's gotten positive feedback
5:23 am
from teen girls who said they haven't seen more who look more like them represented in fashion -- >> i'm just going to walk -- >> that picture is plus sized? >> that is a normal person. what in the world is wrong with people? >> she looks fantastic. >> she's plus sizeded? >> this is an ongoing saga. the ceo speaking out after taylor swift very publicly pulled her songs from the streaming serious. many artists say spotify doesn't pay enough to use their music. but he says swift was on track to make $6 million with them this year. still, her new record pulled in nearly $12 million in its first week alone. defending the streaming service payout to artists saying they've given $2 billion to artists and songwriters since 2008. >> spotify is great. she sold 1.2 million albums in a week. >> in a week.
5:24 am
>> without spotify. >> what do you got here? >> "new york times." a taxi service in new york city aimed at women is finding a loyal fan base. allows women to request a car and a female driver to transport them around the city. the concept is aimed at helping women feel safer in cabs in cities around the country. while anyone is able to use the app and there are male drivers only parties including women can request a female driver. >> that's a good idea. >> i think it works. especially -- yeah, i like it. "the wall street journal." what separates real mayonnaise from fake mayonnaise. it is suing start-up company for selling a plant-based alternative known as just mayo. u unilever which makes hellmann's. saying horse and buggy definitions for mayo. >> mayo fight.
5:25 am
>> what? >> taking that one. >> how did that one get in there? >> i don't know. >> i like the deer with the pumpkin on his head. >> why do we keep going back to that? >> i'm not, i'm just -- >> it was such a slow news day that we had this pumpkin on his head just walking around. i'm serious. and it wasn't even a pumpkin. it was a plastic pumpkin. but you can carry candy in. >> poor little guy. he's okay. that's the good news. >> that's because young earl tackled him. >> from a deer stand -- >> the things that we know. okay. we'll show that later. >> we need to. >> when someone boring comes -- >> oh, there it is. there it is. aww. >> the deer was okay. >> that's just not right. >> thanks to the guy who jumped out of the tree and tackled him and pulled it off. >> the story behind one man's two-year trek into the alaskan
5:26 am
wilderness. now the man's sister is here to share a different side of her brother's story. "morning joe" continues after a break. earning unlimited cash back on purchases. that's a win. but imagine earning it twice. introducing the citi® double cash card. it lets you earn cash back twice, once when you buy and again as you pay. it's cash back. then cash back again. and that's a cash back win-win . the citi double cash card. the only card that lets you earn cash back twice on every purchase with 1% when you buy and 1% as you pay. with two ways to earn, it makes a lot of other cards seem one-sided. my motheit's delicious. toffee in the world. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love.
5:27 am
we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. i have $40,ney do you have in your pocket right now? $21. could something that small make an impact on something as big as your retirement? i don't think so. well if you start putting that towards your retirement every week and let it grow over time, for twenty to thirty years, that retirement challenge
5:28 am
might not seem so big after all. ♪ from san francisco to silicon valley, boston private bank works with all kinds of people who are innovating, building, contributing -- individuals, business owners, private partnerships, non-profits, families planning their financial futures. people like you. if you want the individual attention and expertise your financial needs deserve, this is your time. this is your private bank. everyone is looking for ways while to cut expenses.s unique, and that's where pg&e's online business energy checkup tool can really help. you can use it to track your actual energy use. find rebates that make equipment upgrades more affordable. even develop a customized energy plan for your company. think of it as a way to take more control over your operating costs.
5:29 am
and yet another energy saving opportunity from pg&e. find new ways to save energy and money with pg&e's business energy check-up.
5:30 am
is there anybody here? guess not. an extremist. an aesthetic voyager whose home is -- >> that was a scene from the 2007 movie "into the wild" based on the wilderness adventures of the late chris mccandless. his sister core ring decided it was time to reveal the parts of her brother's story that had never been revealed. she's out with her new book "the wild truth." that was an incredible story. yet you feel the need to set the record straight. so why don't we start there.
5:31 am
because there's some -- what would you say, inaccuracies, misunderstanding? >> misunderstandings. john krakow wrote a stellar book in "into the wild." a lot of the information that wasn't in that book is my fault. there are a lot of things that i told john that i wanted him to understand chris, but it's not something i was ready to share with the rest of the world. chris' story is a very powerful symbol of the devastating effects that domestic violence can have on children. and that is a misconception that people don't understand. >> so let's get to that, because that was always the big hole in the story. i mean, you can understand, you know, a young guy, you know, wanting to go off to the wilderness, to experience nature, to be with himself or of himself. but the lack of communication with the family. so what happened? why did he leave? what was the driving factor
5:32 am
forcing him into the wilderness? >> you use that word "force." there's misconception sometimes that people don't understand it's a lot more than just some ill-fated fantasy. chris' love for nature certainly was why he chose to go in that direction and where he chose to kind of go through his own recovery from what we went through in our childhood. >> what did you go through? >> well, domestic violence. i think people don't understand oftentimes that domestic violence in all form, whether it be physical, psychological, emotional, it's a trauma that exists. >> what was it in this case? >> the precipitator? >> my father especially, as far as the physical standpoints of violence. but, you know, my mother was his primary victim. but unfortunately, she wasn't strong enough to get herself or us out of that situation. she went from being a victim to an accomplice and it's a very unfortunate situation. i understand why people suffer in silence.
5:33 am
it took me 20 years to write this book. i get it. i'm really hoping that this book helps other people find their voice. >> john. >> what was the -- why after 20 years? was there something in your own life that led you to this particular time to tell the story? >> several things. first and foremost, probably becoming a mother. and understanding the importance of truth. i have a special needs child. i want her to feel empowered. i know that the absolute best thing to do that for her is just to be very open and honest and have a positive home environment. i'm also working with students as a lecture. into the wild is required reading at thousands of high schools and colleges across the country. >> and wrote about it. it's very powerful. i've seen that connection. when i go and share the rest of our story and -- by telling my story, i'm filling in the blanks of chris' story. that becomes not just an
5:34 am
assignment for these students anymore but it becomes a lesson that they really take with them outside of the classroom. for years as i've been doing this work, i've seen the incredible impockact it has ande difference it makes. i just knew that i had something important to share. i knew it was type ime to do th >> during your time of spending 20 years waiting to do this but also the exploration it takes personally to invest in doing this book, you write that chris was your protector as a kid going through a lot of these violent situations. so do you harbor any anger towards your brother for leaving? and then also now leaving you later in life? and if so, did you find forgiveness in this journey of putting this book together? for what your relationship with your brother is? and where this takes you now moving forward with what that relationship means and what it means to your life today? >> i can honestly say that i never was upset with chris. i was never angry at all towards him. i completely understood why he had to leave. i completely understood, you
5:35 am
know, after learning of his death which was devastating. it was telling me there wasn't going to be oxygen in the air the next day that chris would be gone. i never thought chris would find himself in the situation that he couldn't get through. i just think that it's sometimes difficult for people to understand, but i get it. chris and i have this connection. and i understood why he needed to go. i loved him enough to deal with the not knowing where he was. and i knew that i would see it again. and i have a very strong faith. and my brother had a strong faith. and, you know, i believe he's still with me. i believe he was -- like, during the process, i wrote this book with a focus on truth and with muir intent in my heart. chris taught me that that's what's most important. >> your life growing up, your life with your brother, your love for your break your family and what your family
5:36 am
experienced. was there a point in time? is there now a point in time when you think parts of it or all of it were your fault? were you able to get over that new feeling? >> as far as when we were little kids, when we were children, we were told this was our fault. that the tum mauultuous things were happening. a lot of people don't understand, that's part of filling in the blanks in this story. i'm the youngest of eight children. so, you know, we had six other we're brothers and sisters from my father's wife marsha. and my mother was his mistress. and all of our ages are intermixed. and my mother became walt's second wife. but it's a very -- it took a long time to really understand all of that because when you're a young child, you don't know what it means that your one brother that's three months older than your brother chris -- >> i think you could take a lifetime trying to unwind that. >> it takes about 20 years.
5:37 am
and then some solid chapters to lay it out to everybody. but, you know, it's part of the mystery and it answers a lot of questions why what drove chris. >> so many kids are being forced to think about themselves, forced in a really good way, being challenged, is a better word, because of chris' story. my daughter wrote an essay. the question was, would you ever do it? her answer i read when i was on a cross country flight. going through her summer reading essays and thinking about her college applications. i was crying the whole way to where i was going. and it was the most revealing answer from a kid who doesn't really open up. so it's amazing. the story sparks the imagination and the soul a little bit. >> you know, i think it's also about understanding the difference between selfishness and self-awareness. sometimes people think he was selfish but he was far from that. i think it's so important in the
5:38 am
work i do with education. i see with these students. it's getting them to, you know, they're at this age of opportunity where they're decidi deciding who they're going to be and laying that foundation for who they're going to become. i think this book is very important for so many ages. >> the book is "the wild truth." corrine mccandless, thank you. one of the great writers of his generation, horror legend stephen king. plus, why banks are facing new fines this morning. and the former navy s.e.a.l. who claims he killed osama bin laden is sharing some never heard before information. we'll be right back. ok, if you're up there, i could use some help. smart sarah. seeking guidance. just like with your investments. that sets you apart. it does? it does. you're type e*.
5:39 am
and seeking another perspective is what type e*s do. oh, and your next handhold... is there. you don't have to go it alone. e*trade gives you the support and guidance to make informed decisions. are you type e*?
5:40 am
♪ there's confidence... then there's trusting your vehicle maintenance to ford service confidence.
5:41 am
our expertise, technology, and high quality parts means your peace of mind. it's no wonder last year we sold over three million tires. and during the big tire event, get up to $140 in mail-in rebates on four select tires. ♪ shyou see this right? it's 80% confidence and 64% knee brace. that's more... shh... i know that's more than 100%. but that's what winners give. now bicycle kick your old 401(k) into an ira. i know, i know. listen, just get td ameritrade's rollover consultants on the horn. they'll guide you through the whole process. it's simple. even she could do it. whatever, janet. for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this.
5:42 am
all right, it's time now for business before the bell. with cnbc's michelle car russ year cabrera. >> we're watching shares of massey's which just reported earnings. they give us a sense of of what the holidays may be like. we'll watch how those shares trade today. we'll watch the shares of several banks when it comes to currency manipulation. we've gotten hints from some of the banks there was some kind of investigation. there's been some fines. we'll see if it gets some news before it's taken off the table for some of the banks. so many deals coming out of the china/us summit. we're talking about big deals between china and the united
5:43 am
states when it comes to reduction on tariffs. which could be a real help to the technology industry in the united states. so that's pretty exciting when it comes to the business angle of what's going on over there. >> michelle, thanks very much. >> so it is part of our military history that was never really meant to be revealed. it is what exactly happened. the raid that killed osama bin laden, the details. now one of the members of s.e.a.l. team 6 says he is the one who fired the fatal shot and is describing in unprecedented detail exactly what happened that night in pakistan. nbc's peter alexander has the story. >> standing on two feet in front of me, with his hands on his wife, was the face that i'd seen thousands of times. it was ubl. my first thought was, we got hi, him, we just ended the war. >> the former s.e.a.l. team 6
5:44 am
sniper who says he fired the fatal shot. the montana native who's been traveling the country giving paid motivational speeches describe months of preparation for the risky may 2011 raid. >> the more we trained on it, the more we realized this is going to be a one-way mission. we're going to go and we're not going to come back. we're going to die when the house blows up. we're going to die when he blows up. or we'll be there too long, we'll be arrested by the pakistanis and we'll spend the rest of our short lives in pakistan prison. it's worth it to kill him. because he's going to tie with us. >> reporter: o'neil's decision to go public is not without controversy. he's not alone. the department of justice is investigating former s.e.a.l. matt bisonette who wrote a best-seller under the pen name mark owen about shooting bin laden. without ever clearing his book with the government. last month, the s.e.a.l.'s commander fired off a stern letter, reminding their code of secrecy. i do not advertise the nature of my work, nor seek recognition
5:45 am
for my actions. bisonette recently told nbc news there are inconsistencies about who's allowed to talk and who isn't. noting the pentagon helped hollywood recreate the raid for "zero dark thirty." >> everybody was talking about this. >> reporter: for his part, o'neil says months passed before it finally sunk in he shot osama bin laden. >> i thought about it every day. for a number of years. i'm still try to figure out if it's the best thing i've ever done or the worst thing i've ever done. >> it's an amazing admission. a former senior s.e.a.l. team 6 leader who knows both bisonette and o'neil told nbc news he was quote utterly disappointed with both men but other former s.e.a.l.s insist that higher-ups created a double standard where some are rewarded for speaking out and others are not. >> fair debate, but it just seems i mean, seems untoward, i don't know. >> it's the intersection of the
5:46 am
instant media culture with an ancient military culture. >> it just seems like there's a code with s.e.a.l.s. i mean, beyond the actual ones. but kind of a moral code. okay. >> it remains to be seen if that other s.e.a.l. is going to come forward. the one they say was also there that took the first shot. coming up next, bringing new meaning to the phrase hard coverings. best selling author steve be king joins the table to reveal his all-star band of writers. keep it locked in on "morning joe." you know how fast you were going? about 55. where you headed at such an appropriate speed? across the country to enhance the nation's most reliable 4g lte network. how's it working for ya? better than ever. how'd you do it? added cell sites. increased capacity. and your point is... so you can download music, games, and directions for the road when you need them. who's this guy? oh that's charlie. you ever put pepper spray on your burrito? i like it spicy but not like uggggh spicy.
5:47 am
he always like this? you have no idea. at&t. the nation's most reliable 4g lte network. how did edward jones get so big? let me just put this away. ♪ could you teach our kids that trick? [ male announcer ] by not acting that way. it's how edward jones makes sense of investing.
5:48 am
it's how edward jones wethey were a littlehorizons to mbit skeptical.ss, what they do actually is rocket science. but at ge capital we also bring expertise from across ge, like lean process engineers we asked who does what, when, where, and why that step first? ideas for improvement started pouring out. with a little help from us, they actually doubled their output speed. if you just need a loan, just call a bank. at ge capital, we're builders. and what we know... can help you grow. oats go! wow!
5:49 am
go power oats! go! go power! yayyyy!
5:50 am
here with us now, a long with brian sullivan and mike barnac barnacle, best-selling author stephen king. very good to have you on. >> thank you. >> you talk a lot about religion in this book and talk about how two men get together and device a deal that the devil couldn't have even dreamed of. tell us about it. >> the far tonarrator of the bo meets a young pastor. it's his first church. he's very young and eager and very involved with children. so the methodist youth fellowship. it's a lot of auto bi biographi
5:51 am
stuff there. because that's how i grew up. a terrible accident. he loses his wife and son. then he loses his faith. when jamie meets him again, jamie's a drug addict and the reverend jacobs is running a carney show where he takes pictures of people in lightning and gives them these 3-d portraits because he's -- kind of your basic mad scientist story. >> and a rock star. >> he's more my kind of rhythm guitarist. not very good but good enough to play in a lot of groups over the years. stephen king, you're still playing? >> i still play. some people call it that. it's a group of writers called the rock bottom remainders. the secret of the remainders is that some of those guys can actually play. you see. and i can play a little, but i
5:52 am
can't really, like, play. >> but you play with them once in a while? >> once in a while. i'm a rock bottom amaretis. >> these two men come together all these years later. >> it starts in 1962 when jamie's 6 and it ends this year in 2014. and jamie discovered that this guy's lost his faith, but he's also discovered what he calls the secret electricity, which is possible to heal people with this. he heals the main character of his drug addiction, but there's a -- there are side effects with some people. and there's one guy who is cured of muscular dystrophy but feels an urge to eat dirt. there's another guy who's cured of park be son's disease but he has tourettes an sib dome, but they get worse and worse, these
5:53 am
effects. with the electricity, i was thinking about victor franken sign and the monster and i also wanted to talk a little bit about what is beyond death because the reverend has lost his wife and son and very curious about whether or not there's some sort of after life. this is after he loses his traditional christian faith. >> you know, i don't want to -- i don't want to find out where we're going on the revival. i just started it. but the use of the narrative, the narrator in this, the voice of the narrator, how do you arrive at deciding when the narrator is going to leave off and you're going to take us down some other dark trail within the context of the book? >> well, you're stuck with the narrator in this story because jamie narrates the whole thing. but when i sit down to write a book, it's never even a question
5:54 am
about whether it's going to be the i voice. the character is going to narrate it. or whether it's going to be some outside, you know, omniscient third person. it just declares itself. this one, when it's a first-person narrative, i like that because it feels comforting to me, almost feels like my own voice. >> i've got a great story involving your short story "the lawn mower man," which i'll share off camera. you guys are all authors and i'm a business guy. you're one of the most powerful authors in the world. amazon, good for you business, bad for your business? >> that's not boring, i'm interested. >> amazon's good for business. back in 2001, my publisher came to me and said, we have this crazy idea. we thought we'd like to do something and just have it available for download to computers. you know how fast all this stuff grew up, you know, just sort of boom. >> exploded. >> i said, okay, let's try it.
5:55 am
i did a story called "riding the boy." i had it. i said, why not. it knocked down their server because everybody came in at once. demonstrated there was an appetite for this sort of thing. here's what i love. that was the one time in my life where i would be in airport departure lounges, when business guys would come up to me and they didn't want to talk about the story and say how much they loved it, they wanted to say, this is a new income stream, it's wonderful. and so it's like, again, like, revival and charles jacob's secret electricity. there's a good side to it. there's a bad side to it as well. so it's kind of put the whole book store business at risk. and also the traditional publishing thing. >> absolutely. either way, this will do well. the book is revival. stephen king. thank you very much. great to have you. >> i love to be here.
5:56 am
>> thank you so much. >> we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." you pay your auto insurance premium every month on the dot. you're like the poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. there are more reasons than ever why now is the best time to be on verizon. one: verizon's the largest, most reliable 4g lte network in the country. that's right america. with xlte in over 400 markets. two: and here's something for families to get excited about. our best pricing ever! get 2 lines with an incredible 10gb of data to share for the low price of $110!
5:57 am
or just $140 for a family of 4! and three: get $150 credit for every line you switch. the more you switch, the more you get. verizon. and for many, it's a struggle to keep your a1c down. so imagine, what if there was a new class of medicine that works differently to lower blood sugar? imagine, loving your numbers. introducing once-daily invokana®. it's the first of a new kind of prescription medicine that's used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. invokana® is a once-daily pill that works around the clock to help lower a1c. here's how: the kidneys allow sugar to be absorbed back into the body. invokana® reduces the amount of sugar allowed back in, and sends some sugar out through the process of urination. and while it's not for weight loss, it may help you lose some weight. invokana® can cause important side effects, including dehydration, which may cause some people to have loss
5:58 am
of body water and salt. this may also cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak especially when you stand up. other side effects may include kidney problems, genital yeast infections, urinary tract infections, changes in urination, high potassium in the blood, or increases in cholesterol. do not take invokana® if you have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis or if allergic to invokana® or its ingredients. symptoms of allergic reaction may include rash, swelling, difficulty breathing or swallowing. if you experience any of these symptoms, stop taking invokana® and call your doctor right away or go to the nearest hospital. tell your doctor about any medical conditions, medications you are taking, and if you have kidney or liver problems. using invokana® with a sulfonylurea or insulin may increase risk of low blood sugar. it's time. lower your blood sugar with invokana®.
5:59 am
imagine loving your numbers. ask your doctor about invokana®. tomorrow on "morning joe," this is what i learn eed today. we have andy cohen. what did you learn today?
6:00 am
>> i learned haley barbour, charlie rangel, what's old is new again. from 1975. you'll love the language. >> i did learn if you need an archival reference to "saturday night live," thomas roberts is your man. >> he's got it all right here. >> if it's way too early, what time is it? it's time for "morning joe." "the daily rundown" is up next. have a great day. the winds change. the world's top two polluters, the united states and china, what it means for american businesses. will china stick to it? more details coming up on a big headline that came out of months of secret talks. also, on the world stage. michael brown's parents taking their message against violence to a united nations meeting in europe. as missouri's governor and other state leaders talk about their plans to keep the peace in ferguson. once the grand jury's decision is announc

161 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on